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GB/T 18655-2018 (GBT18655-2018)

GB/T 18655-2018_English: PDF (GBT 18655-2018, GBT18655-2018)
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GB/T 18655-2018English305 Add to Cart 0--9 seconds. Auto-delivery Vehicles, boats and internal combustion engines -- Radio disturbance characteristics -- Limits and methods of measurement for the protection of on-board receivers Valid GB/T 18655-2018

BASIC DATA
Standard ID GB/T 18655-2018 (GB/T18655-2018)
Description (Translated English) Vehicles, boats and internal combustion engines -- Radio disturbance characteristics -- Limits and methods of measurement for the protection of on-board receivers
Sector / Industry National Standard (Recommended)
Classification of Chinese Standard L06
Classification of International Standard 33.100
Word Count Estimation 130,190
Date of Issue 2018-07-13
Date of Implementation 2019-02-01
Older Standard (superseded by this standard) GB/T 18655-2010
Drafting Organization China Automotive Technology and Research Center, Shanghai Electric Apparatus Research Institute, Changchun Automobile Testing Center, China Automotive Research and Inspection Center (Tianjin) Co., Ltd., China Institute of Metrology, National Radio Monitoring Center Testing Center, Nanjing Rong Testing Technology Co., Ltd. National Automobile Quality Supervision and Inspection Center (Yangyang), Electronic Industry Standardization Research Institute of Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, BMW Brilliance Automotive Co., Ltd., Tianjin Internal Combustion Engine Research Institute, China Automotive Engineering Research Institute Co., Ltd., BYD Auto Industry Co., Ltd., Shanghai Motor Vehicle Testing Center, Pan Asia Automotive Technology Center Co., Ltd., Ford Automotive Engineering Research Co., Ltd., Chongqing Vehicle Inspection and Research Institute Co., Ltd., Beijing New Energy Automobile Co., Ltd., Shanghai Lelai Automotive Analysis and Testing Co., Ltd., Guangzhou Chenghao Electronics Division
Administrative Organization National Radio Interference Standardization Technical Committee (SAC/TC 79)
Regulation (derived from) National Standard Announcement No. 10 of 2018
Proposing organization National Radio Interference Standardization Technical Committee (SAC/TC 79)
Issuing agency(ies) State Administration of Markets; China National Standardization Administration

Standards related to: GB/T 18655-2018

GB/T 18655-2018
Vehicles, boats and internal combustion engines--Radio disturbance characteristics--Limits and methods of measurement for the protection of on-board receivers
ICS 33.100
L06
National Standards of People's Republic of China
Replace GB/T 18655-2010
Radio disturbance characteristics of vehicles, boats and internal combustion engines
Limits and measurement methods for protecting on-board receivers
(CISPR25..2016, MOD)
Published on.2018-07-13
Implementation of.2019-02-01
State Market Supervisory Administration
China National Standardization Administration issued
Content
Foreword V
Introduction VII
1 range 1
2 Normative references 1
3 Terms and Definitions 2
4 General requirements for vehicle and component/module emission measurements 4
4.1 General test requirements 4
4.2 Shielding room 6
4.3 Shielded room (ALSE) with absorbing material 6
4.4 Measuring instrument 7
4.5 Power supply 10
5 Emission measurement received by the vehicle antenna 10
5.1 Antenna Measurement System 10
5.2 Measurement method 12
5.3 Test arrangement in vehicle charging mode 13
5.4 Examples of limits for vehicle radiated disturbances 21
6 Measurement of parts and modules 23
6.1 General requirements 23
6.2 Test equipment 24
6.3 Conducted emissions of components/modules---Voltage method 24
6.4 Conducted emission of components/modules---current probe method 31
6.5 Radiation Emissions of Parts/Modules---ALSE Method 34
6.6 Radiation Emissions of Parts/Modules---TEM Chamber Method 43
6.7 Radiation Emissions of Parts/Modules---Stripline Method 43
Appendix A (informative appendix) Flow chart of applicability check of this standard 44
Appendix B (Normative Appendix) Antenna Matching Unit---Vehicle Test 45
Appendix C (informative) Surface current suppressor 47
Appendix D (informative) Guidelines for determining the noise floor of active vehicle antennas in the AM and FM bands 48
Appendix E (Normative) Artificial Network (AN), Artificial Power Network (AMN), and Asymmetric Artificial Network (AAN) 50
Appendix F (informative) Radiation emission of components/modules---TEM cell method 57
Appendix G (informative) Radiation emission of components/modules---stripline method 65
Appendix H (informative) Interference of the presence of impulse noise on mobile wireless communications---Methods for judging degradation 71
Appendix I (Normative) Test methods for high voltage power systems for shielded electric and hybrid vehicles 74
Appendix J (informative) ALSE performance verification (150kHz~1GHz) 100
Reference 121
Figure 1 Method for judging conformity of all frequency bands 5
Figure 2 Gain curve example 12
Figure 3 Example of vehicle radiation emission test arrangement (view using monopole antenna) 13
Figure 4 Example of vehicle test arrangement of vehicle socket on the side of the vehicle body (AC charging without communication) 15
Figure 5 Example of vehicle test arrangement of vehicle socket in front/rear of vehicle body (AC charging without communication) 16
Figure 6 Example of vehicle test arrangement of vehicle socket on the side of the vehicle body (AC or DC charging with communication) 19
Figure 7 Example of vehicle test arrangement of vehicle socket in front/rear of vehicle body (AC or DC charging with communication) 20
Figure 8 Average value of the average radiated disturbance of the satellite in the satellite positioning band 22
Figure 9 Conducted Emissions---Test Placement Example of Tested Part Grounded at the Remote End of Power Loop
Fig. 10 Conducted emission---Testing arrangement of the test piece grounded at the near end of the power return line
Figure 11 Conducted Emissions---Generator Test Arrangement Example 28
Figure 12 Conducted Emissions---Ignition System Parts Test Arrangement Example 29
Figure 13 Conducted Emissions - Current Probe Test Arrangement Example 32
Figure 14 Test harness bending requirements 35
Figure 15 Example of test arrangement - monopole antenna 37
Figure 16 Example of test arrangement - double cone antenna 38
Figure 17 Example of test arrangement --- logarithmic period antenna 39
Figure 18 Example of test arrangement - above -1GHz 40
Figure 19 Example of component/module radiated disturbance average limit 42
Figure A.1 Flow chart of this standard suitability check 44
Figure B.1 Verification Arrangement 46
Figure C.1 S21 characteristic curve of ferrite magnetic ring 47
Figure D.1 Vehicle layout for measuring equipment noise in the AM/FM band 48
Figure D.2 Vehicle layout for measuring AM/FM band antenna noise 49
Figure E.1 5μH Artificial Network (AN) Schematic Example 50
Figure E.2 Impedance characteristics of the artificial network (AN) ZPB 51
Figure E.3 Schematic example of a 5μH high voltage artificial network (HV-AN) schematic 52
Figure E.4 Example of a single 5μH high voltage artificial network (HV-AN) sharing a shielded enclosure 52
Figure E.5 Impedance matching network between HV-AN and the device under test 53
Figure E.6 AAN example 54 for symmetric communication lines
Figure E.7 Example of AAN Circuitry for PLC on AC or DC Power Lines 55
Figure E.8 Example of AAN Circuit Diagram for PLC on Guide Line 56
Figure F.1 TEM cell (example) 57
Figure F.2 TEM cell lead and example to the interface board lead layout 58
Figure F.3 Example of Arrangement of Connectors, Terminal Blocks, and Insulation Brackets 59
Figure F.4 Example of Minimum Attenuation Value Required for Control/Signal Lines 60
Figure F.5 Filter attenuation measurement arrangement 60
Figure F.6 Example of TEM cell test setup 61
Figure F.7 TEM cell 63
Figure G.1 Shielded indoor stripline test arrangement legend 67
Figure G.2 50Ω stripline example 69
Figure G.3 90Ω stripline example 70
Figure I.1 Conducted Emissions---Example of Test Arrangement of Tested Parts with Shielded Power System 76
Figure I.2 Conducted Emissions---Example of Test Arrangement of Tested Parts with Shielded Power System and Motor Placed on the Rack 77
Figure I.3 Conducted Emissions - Example of Inverter Test Arrangement with Shielded Power System 78
Figure I.4 Conducted Emissions - Example of a Charger Test Arrangement with Shielded Power System 79
Figure I.5 Conducted Emissions--Example of a test arrangement for measuring the HV line of the device under test with a shielded power system using a current probe 83
Figure I.6 Conducted Emissions---Testing the HV line of the device under test with a shielded power system and the motor placed on the pedestal using a current probe
Inspection arrangement example 84
Figure I.7 Conducted Emissions - Example of a test arrangement for measuring an inverter HV line with a shielded power system using a current probe 85
Figure I.8 Conducted Emissions - Example of a test arrangement for measuring a HV line of a charger with a shielded power system using a current probe 86
Figure I.9 Radiated Emissions - Example of a test arrangement for a DUT with a shielded power system using a biconical antenna
Figure I.10 Radiated Emissions---Tests with Shielded Power Systems, Tested Parts with Motors Attached to the Bench Using a Double Cone Antenna
Layout example 89
Figure I.11 Radiated Emissions - Example of a test arrangement for an inverter with a shielded power system using a biconical antenna
Figure I.12 Radiated Emissions – Example of a test arrangement for a charger with a shielded power system using a biconical antenna
Figure I.13 Test arrangement for test signal calibration 93
Figure I.14 Conducted Emission---Voltage Method---Experimental Arrangement Example for Measuring Decoupling Coefficient Between HV and LV Power Ports
Figure I.15 Conducted Emission - Current Method - Example of Test Arrangement for Measuring Decoupling Coefficient Between HV and LV Power Ports 95
Figure I.16 Radiation Emissions---ALSE Method--Test Arrangement for Measuring Decoupling Coefficient Between HV and LV Power Ports Using a Double Cone Antenna
Example 96
Figure I.17 Test arrangement 98 measured by the test piece S21
Figure I.18 Coupling Attenuation ɑc Requirements Example 99
Figure J.1 Example of the influence parameter of the ALSE in the 10MHz~100MHz band 101
Figure J.2 Visual representation of the ALSE performance validation process 102
Figure J.3 Example of monopole transmit antenna structure 103
Figure J.4 Side view of the antenna arrangement for frequency reference measurements below 30 MHz 105
Figure J.5 Top view of the antenna arrangement for reference measurements at frequencies above 30 MHz (taking a biconical antenna as an example) 106
Figure J.6 Side view of the antenna arrangement for reference measurements at 30 MHz and above (in the case of a biconical antenna) 106
Figure J.7 Top view of the antenna arrangement for ALSE measurement at frequencies below 30 MHz 107
Figure J.8 Metal gusset 110 for supporting brass rods
Figure J.9 Side view of radiator (with 50Ω terminal) 110
Figure J.10 Physical photo 110 of the radiator mounted on the reference ground plane
Figure J.11 VSWR of the four sources measured (no 10dB attenuator) 111
Figure J.12 Example of the arrangement of the equivalent field strength measurement in the ALSE (monopole antenna with a frequency below 30 MHz) 113
Figure J.13 Calculation model using MoM in the 30MHz~200MHz band 114
Table 1 Spectrum Analyzer Parameters 7
Table 2 Scanning Receiver Parameters 9
Table 3 Antenna Type 11
Table 4 Example of disturbance limit---Complete vehicle method 21
Table 5 Conducted Disturbance Limits---Voltage Method Example 30
Table 6 Conducted Disturbance Limits---Current Probe Method 33
Table 7 Example of Radiated Disturbance Limits for Parts/Modules---ALSE Method 41
Table E.1 Artificial Network (AN) Impedance (ZPB) Value 51
Table F.1 Radiation Disturbance Limits---TEM Chamber Method 62
Table F.2 Dimensions of TEM cells 64
Table G.1 Example of Radiated Disturbance Limits---Stripline Method 67
Table I.1 (based on HV-LV decoupling level 5) Shielded power supply unit Conducted voltage measurement HV limit example 80
Table I.2 Measurement configuration example of equipment without negative LV line 98
Table I.3 Measurement configuration example 98 of the device with negative LV line
Table I.4 Minimum coupling attenuation ɑc example 99
Table J.1 Reference data for ALSE validation 114
Foreword
This standard was drafted in accordance with the rules given in GB/T 1.1-2009.
This standard replaces GB/T 18655-2010 "Car, ship and internal combustion engine radio disturbance characteristics for the protection of vehicle receivers
Value and measurement method. Compared with GB/T 18655-2010, the main technical changes are as follows.
--- Increased the charging mode of electric and hybrid vehicles;
--- Added ALSE performance verification method;
--- Increased test methods for high voltage power systems shielded in electric and hybrid vehicles.
This standard uses the redrafting method to modify the use of CISPR25.2016 "vehicle, ship and internal combustion engine radio disturbance characteristics for protection
Limits and Measurement Methods for Vehicle Receivers.
Compared with CISPR25.2016, the technical differences and their causes are as follows.
--- Removed the international standard terms 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.7, 3.10, 3.12, 3.14, 3.19, 3.20, 3.21 and 3.23 because of these
The language has been listed in GB/T 4365-2003 and GB/T 29259-2012;
---According to the actual use of the carrier frequency of the vehicle receiver in China, this standard applies the service/frequency range in CISPR25.2016
Make adjustments as follows.
● Adjust the TV band I band, the original frequency band is 41MHz~88MHz, and the adjustment is 48.5MHz~72.5MHz;
● Adjust the TV band III band, the original frequency band is 174 MHz~230 MHz, and the adjustment is 174 MHz~
223MHz;
● Adjust the TV band IV/V band, the original frequency band is 468MHz~944MHz, and the adjustment is 470MHz~
566MHz, 606MHz~806MHz;
● Adjust the DTTV band, the original frequency band is 470MHz~770MHz, and the adjustment is 470MHz~566MHz.
606MHz~806MHz;
● Adjust the RKE band, the original frequency band is 300MHz~330MHz, and the adjustment is 314MHz~316MHz;
● Adjust the RKE band, the original frequency band is 420MHz~450MHz, and the adjustment is 430MHz~440MHz;
● Adjust the EGSM/GSM900 band, the original frequency band is 925MHz~960MHz, and the adjustment is 930MHz~
960MHz;
● Adjust the GSM1800 (PCN) band, the original frequency band is 1803 MHz~1882 MHz, after adjustment
1805MHz~1850MHz;
● Adjust the 3G/IMT2000 band, the original frequency band is 1900MHz~1992MHz, and the adjustment is 1880MHz~
1920MHz;
● Adjust the 3G/IMT2000 band, the original frequency band is 2108MHz~2172MHz, and the adjustment is 2110MHz~
2170MHz;
● The CB band has been deleted, the original frequency band is 26MHz~28MHz; the GSM800 band, the original frequency band is 860MHz~895MHz;
GSM1900 band, the original frequency band 1850MHz~1990MHz;
● Added BDS, B1I Beidou civil band 1553MHz~1569MHz;
--- According to the principle of different test arrangements of inverter and charger, split Figure I.3 of CISPR25.2016 into Figure I.3 and Figure I.4,
Figure I.6 is split into Figure I.7 and Figure I.8, Figure I.9 is split into Figure I.11 and Figure I.12;
--- Taking into account the actual situation in China, the informational appendix K "Future Work Project" was deleted.
This standard is proposed and managed by the National Radio Interference Standardization Technical Committee (SAC/TC79).
This standard was drafted. China Automotive Technology Research Center, Shanghai Electric Apparatus Research Institute, Changchun Automobile Testing Center, China Automotive Research Automotive Inspection
Testing Center (Tianjin) Co., Ltd., China Institute of Metrology, National Radio Monitoring Center Testing Center, Nanjing Rong Testing Technology Co., Ltd.
Company, National Automobile Quality Supervision and Inspection Center (Xiangyang), Ministry of Industry and Information Technology Electronics Industry Standardization Research Institute, BMW Brilliance Automotive Co., Ltd.
Company, Tianjin Internal Combustion Engine Research Institute, China Automotive Engineering Research Institute Co., Ltd., BYD Auto Industry Co., Ltd., Shanghai Motor Vehicle Inspection
Testing Center, Pan Asia Automotive Technology Center Co., Ltd., Ford Automotive Engineering Research Co., Ltd., Chongqing Vehicle Inspection and Research Institute Co., Ltd., Beijing
New Energy Automobile Co., Ltd., Shanghai Lelai Automotive Analysis and Testing Co., Ltd., Guangzhou Chenghao Electronic Technology Co., Ltd.
The main drafters of this standard. Liu Xin, Lu Gang, Wang Chuanqi, Ren Shan, Liu Yuan, Zheng Junqi, Wang Weilong, Dong Qifeng, Liu Haiming, Xu Li, Cui Qiang,
Hou Xinwei, Zhou Yukui, Shen Xueqi, Zhang Xu, Huang Xuemei, Yang Xiaosong, Yang Shuo, Dong Hong, Gu Hailei, Xiang Yunxiu, Peng Peng, Zhang Xia, Liu Qingsong, Gao Xinjie,
Wen Shiwei, Li Nan, Ma Junjie.
The previous versions of the standards replaced by this standard are.
---GB 18655-2002, GB/T 18655-2010.
introduction
This standard is intended to protect vehicle-mounted receivers from the transmission of conducted and radiated emissions from the vehicle.
The test procedures and limits given here are preventive controls for radiated emissions from vehicles and are long and short for continuous control of components/modules.
The conduction/radiation of time is equally effective. In order to achieve the above objectives, this standard.
--- Establish a test method to measure the electromagnetic emissions of the vehicle electrical system;
--- set limits for the electromagnetic emissions of the electrical system on the vehicle;
--- Establish a test method for vehicle components and modules that do not depend on the entire vehicle;
--- Set limits for the electromagnetic emissions of components to protect the vehicle receiving device from interference;
---Classify vehicle parts according to the duration of disturbances and set the limits.
Note. The test of parts and components is not a substitute for the test of the whole vehicle. The exact connection between the two depends on the installation position of the parts, the length of the wire harness, the arrangement of the wire harness, and the grounding position.
Set and antenna position. Parts can be evaluated first before the actual vehicle is available.
Radio disturbance characteristics of vehicles, boats and internal combustion engines
Limits and measurement methods for protecting on-board receivers
1 Scope
This standard specifies the radio disturbance limits and test methods from 150 kHz to 2500 MHz. This standard applies to
Any electrical/electrical components used in vehicles, trailers and installations. The details of the frequency distribution in this standard refer to the International Telecommunication Union (ITU).
Publications and practical applications in China. The limits in this standard are used to protect the vehicle receiver from the same in-vehicle parts/modules.
The harassment generated by the block. Chapter 5 provides methods and limits for the measurement of the entire vehicle (whether connected to the grid or not). Chapter 6 provides the parts.
Method and limit for component/module measurement. Only vehicle tests based on vehicle limits can be used to finalize component compatibility.
Types of protected receivers include. broadcast receivers (sound and television), terrestrial mobile communications, wireless telephones, amateur, civilian
Line equipment, satellite navigation systems (Beidou, GPS, etc.), Wi-Fi and Bluetooth devices. The vehicles in this standard are internal combustion engines, electric power or both.
Achieve a self-driven device together. Vehicles include, but are not limited to, passenger cars, trucks, farm tractors, and snowmobiles. Can refer to Appendix A
The flowchart in the determination device or device is applicable to this standard.
This standard does not cover the protection of electronic control systems from radio frequency (RF) emissions, transients or pulse voltage fluctuations. These include
In other Standards Committee publications.
The limits in this standard are recommended and can be changed subject to agreement between the vehicle manufacturer and the component supplier. This standard also
Applicable to vehicle manufacturers, parts and equipment suppliers, attached and connected to vehicle wiring harness or vehicle power connector after vehicle delivery
Parts and equipment.
Since the installation location, body structure and harness design affect the coupling of radio disturbances to the onboard receiver, Chapter 6 defines various limits.
Value level. The level of use used (as a function of the frequency band) is subject to agreement by the vehicle manufacturer and the component supplier.
The test methods defined in this standard are intended to help vehicle manufacturers and suppliers improve vehicle and component design to ensure on-board RF emissions.
Shooting control is at a certain level.
The vehicle test limit is used as a guideline based on the case where a typical radio receiver uses a vehicle antenna, if this particular
For the antenna, a test antenna is used. For economic reasons, vehicle manufacturers should independently determine which frequency bands are used for possible radio services in the vehicle.
For example, although the TV band occupies a significant portion of the radio spectrum, many models may not have a TV receiver installed.
It is not economical to test and improve noise sources in this band on such vehicles.
In 1979, the World Management Radiocommunication Conference (WARC) limited the low frequency of the first zone to 148.5 kHz. In terms of vehicles,
A 150 kHz test is sufficient.
See Appendix E for manual networks for conducted disturbances and vehicle charging mode measurements.
A qualitative method for determining the degradation of radio communication in the presence of impulsive noise can be found in Appendix H.
The test methods for high-voltage power systems for in-vehicle shielding of electric and hybrid vehicles are given in Appendix I.
See Appendix J for the performance verification method for ALSE for component testing.
2 Normative references
The following documents are indispensable for the application of this document. For dated references, only dated versions apply to this article.
Pieces. For undated references, the latest edition (including all amendments) applies to this document.
GB/T 4365-2003 Electrotechnical terminology electromagnetic compatibility (idtIEC 60050-161.1990 A1.1997 A2.1998)
GB/T 6113.104-2016 Radio disturbance and immunity measurement equipment and methods of measurement - Part 1-4. Radio disturbance
Antenna and test site for radiation disturbance measurement of immunity measuring equipment (CISPR16-1-4.2012, IDT)
GB/T 6113.203-2016 Radio disturbance and immunity measuring equipment and measuring methods - Part 2-3. Radio disturbance
And immunity measurement methods for radiation disturbance measurements (CISPR16-2-3.2010, IDT)
GB/T 29259-2012 Road vehicle electromagnetic compatibility terminology
3 Terms and definitions
The following terms and definitions as defined in GB/T 4365-2003 and GB/T 29259-2012 apply to this document.
3.1
Artificial power network artificialmainsnetwork;AMN
A network that provides the specified RF impedance for the EUT. It couples the disturbance voltage to the measurement receiver and makes the test circuit and the power supply
Source phase isolation.
Note 1. There are two basic types of artificial power networks. V-type (V-AMN) for coupling asymmetric voltages and coupling symmetrical voltages and asymmetry.
The Δ type of voltage. The term Line Impedance Stabilization Network (LISN) is used interchangeably with the term V-type artificial power network.
Note 2. The network is plugged into a vehicle or component (such as a charger) in power and charging mode to provide a specific frequency within a given frequency range.
Load impedance and electrically isolate the vehicle/component and power supply from this frequency range.
3.2
Artificial network artificialnetwork; AN
Connected at the power line of the device under test or at the signal/load line in series to provide the specified load impedance for the measurement disturbance voltage within a given frequency range
A device that isolates the device under test from the power source or signal/load line.
Note 1. A network connected in series between DC power and charging mode to provide a specific load impedance and drive in a given frequency range
The vehicle and the DC power supply are electrically isolated within this frequency range.
Note 2. The modification adopts GB/T 29259-2012, which defines 3.52.
3.3
Asymmetric artificial network asymmetricartificialnetwork; AAN
Used to measure common-mode voltages on unshielded symmetrical signals (such as telecommunications) (or to inject common-mode voltages onto unshielded signal lines)
A network with the function of suppressing differential mode signals.
Note. The network is connected in series on the communication/signal line in the vehicle/component (eg charger) charging mode to provide a specific load impedance and/or to provide
Coupling (for example, between a communication signal and a power source).
3.4
(device's) bandwidth bandwidth(ofanequipment)
A given characteristic of a device or transmission channel deviates from the bandwidth of a reference value that does not exceed a specified value or ratio.
Note 1. This given characteristic can be amplitude-frequency characteristic, phase-frequency characteristic or delay-frequency characteristic.
Note 2. The modification adopts GB/T 4365-2003 and defines 161-06-09.
3.5
Lap (ground and DC resistance) bonded(groundconnectionandd.c.resistance)
The impedance (resistance and inductance) is as small as possible between two metal parts. The DC resistance should not exceed 2.5mΩ at this time.
Note. It is recommended to use a low current (≤100mA) 4-wire milliohmmeter for measurement.
3.6
Grade class
The level of execution as determined by the purchaser and supplier and determined in the pilot program.
3.7
Device device
Machines driven by internal combustion engines whose main use is not for manned and cargo.
Note. Devices include (but are not limited to) chainsaws, irrigation pumps, snow blowers, air compressors, and landscaping equipment.
3.8
High voltage highvoltage; HV
Operating voltage between 60V and 1000V.
Note. The voltage range defined by the term “high voltage” may vary in other standards.
3.9
High voltage artificial network highvoltageartificialnetwork; HV-AN
Connected in series to the high-voltage DC power line of the device under test to provide a specified load impedance for the measurement disturbance voltage within a given frequency range and
A device in which the measuring device is isolated from the power source.
3.10
Low voltage lowvoltage; LV
DC operating voltage below 60V, such as nominal voltage is 12V, 24V, 48V.
Note. The term “low voltage” has different voltage ranges in other standards.
3.11
Measuring time measurementtime
The continuous effective time associated with the test results at a single frequency point.
--- For the peak detector, the effective time at which the signal envelope maximum is detected;
--- For the quasi-peak detector, the effective time of the envelope weighted maximum is measured;
--- For the average detector, determine the effective time of the signal envelope average.
3.12
Reference ground plane referencegroundplane
A conductive plane whose potential is used as a common reference potential.
Note 1. For this standard, the reference ground plane is defined as the metal plane above the test bench.
Note 2. The modification adopts GB/T 4365-2003 and defines 161-04-36.
3.13
Shielding shell shielddedenclosure
A mesh or sheet metal housing specifically designed to isolate the internal and external electromagnetic environment.
Note. The modification adopts GB/T 4365-2003 and defines 161-04-37 [5].
3.14
Confirm with reference ground plane validationreferencegroundplane
An elevated reference ground plane can be found in Appendix J for reference measurement and modeling with a standard size of 2.5m x 1m.
Note. The reference ground plane used for the measurement of the device under test may differ in size and grounding.
4 General requirements for vehicle and component/module emission measurements
4.1 General test requirements
4.1.1 Type of disturbance source (used in the test plan)
Electromagnetic disturbance sources can be divided into two categories.
---Narrowband disturbance sources (such as vehicle electronic components with clocks, crystals, microprocessors, and digital logic in displays);
--- Broadband disturbance sources (such as motors and ignition systems).
Note 1. Most vehicles or electrical/electrical components are both sources of broadband disturbance and sources of narrowband disturbances, while others are just a single source of disturbance.
Note 2. Broadband disturbance sources can be divided into short-term broadband (such as scrubber motor, electric mirror, power window) and long-term broadband (such as wiper motor, heater motor, hair
Motivation cooling system).
This standard classifies disturbance sources only for the purpose of simplifying the test and reducing the number of detectors used (eg if you know
It is a broadband type of disturbance source, such as a DC brush rectifier motor, you can not use the average detector. Otherwise this standard will require harassment
The source also meets the limits of both detectors regardless of the type of disturbance.
4.1.2 Test plan
A pilot plan should be established for each test task. The test plan shall specify the test frequency range, emission limits, antenna type and placement
Set, test report requirements, supply voltage and other relevant parameters.
The test plan should indicate whether the respective bands are the applicable mea...
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